Lee Konitz – Leewise (2020 Remaster)

The late Lee Konitz is honoured on this classic recording,
recorded as part of the Jazzpar Awards.

This release showcases the work of Konitz in a variety of settings all derived from the JAZZPAR All Star Nonet directed by saxophonist Jens Søndergaard. It begins with three tracks recorded by Radio Denmark during the actual final concert of the series in Copenhagen’s Falkoner Scenen. Sadly, although this reissue has been in preparation for some months, it has now turned into a memorial for Konitz, who died at the age of 92 from complications of the virus Covid_19 on April 15, 2020.

Lee Konitz was one of the most highly
valued individualists of the entire field of jazz. His
recordings from as early as 1947, the year he
turned 20, show that the basis of his unique style
was already formed, partly under the influence of
fellow Chicagoan Lennie Tristano. This fact was
remarkable enough, in an era when all the other
saxophonists who weren’t actively clinging to the approach of Johnny Hodges, Willie Smith or Benny Carter were trying desperately to catch up with Charlie Parker. But Konitz was developing an almost pianistic process, in which his lines were not dictated by what was easy for his instrument and, in addition, were not given a deliberately emotive profile by the articulation and tonal variety of the saxophone.

Available for streaming on your favorite streaming service here.

Available on CD here.

 

Daybreak: New Release from Storyville

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“Enjoy this music with a Sunday morning cup of coffee, a late night whisky or, who knows, at Daybreak.”

Storyville Records presents “Daybreak” by the Icelandic saxophone player Sigurdur Flosasan and Danish Hammond B3 player Kjeld Lauritsen. The album is a follow-up to their previous success “Nightfall”. On both albums musicians embrace the ballad repertoire in collaboration with internationally renowned guitarist Jacob Fischer and swing drummer Kristian Leth.

Daybreak consists of beautiful jazz ballads with a Scandinavian sound, inspired by the unique feeling of when night turns into day. The music depicts the atmosphere of musicians playing together after a late night gig and the relaxed mood of the scene gives a special feeling that connects the people who are left. Sigurdur Flosason explains this feeling as:

“The morning’s music has nothing to prove. It simply is, neither old nor new, complex nor simple. In a way it is the core and the essence of all music.”

On this album the musicians has taken the idea even further, explicitly choosing songs such as “Morning Glory” and “The Night We Called it a Day” – songs that all relate to daybreak.

 

 

Get the album here: http://bit.ly/str-daybreak